You are currently browsing the Belinda Otas blog archives for November, 2010.


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Archive for November, 2010

30Nov

The first time I heard Lisa Shannon speak, it was during an interview on ABC News, presented by Diane Sawyer. I was intrigued by this American woman, who changed her whole life for women across the ocean despite the fact that she didn’t know them by name and was yet to meet a single one […]






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29Nov

In the last few days, I have been consumed by my reading and research into the plight of Congolese women while writing my articles. At some point, I have pondered and wondered, what do I write about which has not been written? What have I got to say that has not been said. In fact, […]






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25Nov

When Michael Vick, the NFL (American Football) player was arrested and tried in the court of law for his role in an illegal dog fighting ‘shenanigans,’ he was also tried by the media and public before he was  sent to jail for his actions. Vick lost everything, I mean, everything that made Michael Vick, Michael […]






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25Nov

You can say what you like, ‘diss’ them all you want and criticise them from Arizona to Alaska but you cannot deny they have got it going on! My world, what a smart lady. They say behind every man is a strong woman, I disagree. Beside every man is a strong woman and Michelle Obama […]






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24Nov

Zainab Salbi speaks and the world listens. She is the founder and CEO of Women for Women International. It takes a special woman to stand up and say, enough is enough and takes action to follow through. Watch and find out why I love this lady. She is more than three times a lady in […]






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24Nov

When you talk about the DRC, the first thing that comes to mind for me is the plight of the thousands of women caught up in a protracted war, with no end in sight. Don’t get this twisted, that’s not all there is to the Democratic Republic of Congo.  Without The DRC, you would have […]






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23Nov

Over the weekend, I heard these words spoken by Dr Pat Francis, a revered humanitarian based in Canada, “Poverty is systemic and it starts with the government. Where Africa is concerned, it started with slavery right up to colonialism.” If you will allow me, I would like to add, today, that systemic poverty is in […]






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22Nov

No one likes to be rejected but it is an inevitable life experience we all have to face at one point or another. From our career to our relationships to family and friends, it can come from the place we least expected it to the very source where we had a faint idea it was […]






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16Nov

Dead of the night They come to me Crying like babies Begging like paupers for a release Of all that’s locked in them Some married Some single Some gay Some hopeless Others, commitment phobics The married ones say their wives can’t pull it off anymore The single ones had rather pay to have their release […]






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15Nov

If sorrow is a companion I go to bed with suicide as my lover Her gentle whisper of loss Loss of hope and glory Her silent but strong voice of conviction Her aroma like the waft of an onion Being peeled one layer at a time till it sinks into you She is a powerful […]






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10Nov

Sarita Mandanna gives us a thrilling and enthralling epic story with her debut novel Tiger Hills. A strong, poetic and fluid narrative, Mandanna writes with the kind of musicality and subtle humour that forces you to sit and read in one go. Set in a coffee plantation in the Coorg region of India, where the […]






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9Nov

Egg-Larva-Pupa-Woman is as intriguing a title, like the story it tells. Written by Ogo Akubue-Ogbota, it is the stirring tale of a young Nigerian girl who metamorphosises into a woman of great courage when mysterious circumstances befall her family. In her own words, Ogo Akubue-Ogbota and why she hopes her readers will be inspired to […]






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8Nov

“Be generous with your advice: live it instead,” says Nana Awere Damoah. He is putting soul back into reading with his collection of heart-warming stories laced with traditional Ghanaian proverbs. Without being preachy, Damoah reiterates the importance of appreciating the value of small beginnings, why parents should appreciate their children while they can and why […]






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6Nov

Mustapha Matura’s adaption of Anton Chekov’s Three Sisters, remains one of my most memorable theatre night out. No ordinary feat, he transported me to the Caribbean with his eclectic characters and electrifying dialogue. Chekhov would have approved. What a fine production that was under the direction of Paulette Randal.  Its 2010, and Matura, the award […]






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5Nov

Welcome to Mannobe, a village with its own personality. It is clear from the onset that Chioma Okereke is a wordsmith, which shines through as her narrative is rich in language. From the sights and sound of Mannobe village, to its exotic taste and colourful characters, with unusual names like Allegory, Jericho, Driver, Guitar and […]






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4Nov

This is a collection of intriguing short stories which transcend beyond the barriers of gender, religion and class. Sefi Atta, winner of the 2009, Noma Award for Publishing, Africa’s highest publishing honour, presents us with a range of versatile narrative voices, which gives us insight into their daily lives and experiences. In the title story, […]






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4Nov

What can I say about the current edition of the New African and New African Woman magazines which both publications don’t tell you when you pick them up? The New African is celebrating its 500th edition and what a bumper edition. From the editorial which is simply titled, 500 and Still We Rise to retrospective […]






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3Nov

Set in a fictitious African village, Leonaroa Miano, the Cameroonian writer tells us the harrowing story of the people of Eku and the night they all wish never happened. Ayané, the protagonist of Miano’s story returns to her village after three years in France. Ostracised and referred to with disdain as the daughter of the […]






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